March 1, 2024

Zimbabwe: Opposition kicks as President Mnangagwa denies poll fraud allegations

President Emmerson Mnangagwa of Zimbabwe has faulted the roles of election observers in the just concluded polls while asking those who are contesting the election to go to court to seek redress.

 

The opposition party earlier accused the ruling ZANU PF of “gigantic fraud” in the Wednesday, Thursday elections conducted across the country.

 

The incumbent president of Zimbabwe Mnangagwa received 52.6% of the vote, while main opposition leader Nelson Chamisa received 44%, according to the electoral commission on Saturday.

 

Chamisa stated on Sunday that his party will not accept the outcome of the polls.

 

He added that he would form the new government, without giving details.

 

 

Observer missions from the European Union, Commonwealth and the 16-nation Southern African Development Community (SADC) raised concerns on a number of issues during the poll, including the banning of opposition rallies, the voters’ list, biased state media coverage and voter intimidation.

 

Mnangagwa on his part criticised the observers on their roles.

 

He said “There are no winners or losers, but one united people of Zimbabwe. Thus far, we have shamed our detractors who wished to see us divided and in turmoil. We shall forever remain a united, peace-loving and resilient people.

 

I don’t think it is in the mandate of election observers to interrogate institutions of a sovereign government, the judiciary, the legislature and the governance. I believe that their mandate is to observe the transparency, peacefulness and fairness in the conduct of the elections, which, I’m happy to say, nobody questions that,” Mnangagwa said.

 

Observers from regional body SADC and from the African Union also criticised the election process as some observers were arrested for election interference.

 

President Mnangagwa was elected president for the first time in 2017 after longstanding strongman Robert Mugabe was deposed in a military coup following 37 years in office.

 

His first term in office was marred by hyperinflation, currency shortages, and skyrocketing unemployment.

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